Motul 7100 instead of 300V for my Pulsar 200NS

Time for an oil change. My previous Pulsar blood was a concoction of Respol fully synthetic 4T 20W50 (800ml) and Motul 300V 15W50 (400ml). The Repsol was what remained from the oil change when I was in Phnom Penh’s Bajaj dealership, and the 300V was what remained of the oil that I brought along for the long SE Asian tour.

To be honest, I did like the 300V. But my own research suggested that the 300V, while being an excellent oil, was really designed for “racing use” (only). At the recent Singapore Bike show, I had the opportunity to speak to the technical representative at the Motul booth. He confirmed my suspicion that the 300V was built for “racing use” and the 7100 4T was probably more suitable for my purpose – daily commute and touring.

Not that the 300V is not good. It’s just that the additive package within the 300V was designed to squeeze out some additional BHP from the engine and wasn’t designed for general / extended use. Racing oils have been known to have minimal detergent in their additive package – stuff which is really necessary to keep the engine clean for street / touring and extended (or even normal) oil change intervals.

I found an excellent technical writeup on engine oils here. The author is a medical doctor and surgeon by training. But he has taken interest in motor oils since high school and have been studying the viscosity properties of motor oils. He continues this curiosity with the study of flow mechanics of human blood. Warning – VERY technical writeup here. But I shall extract a paragraph he wrote:

“Motor oil that is labeled for RACING ONLY is not usable for every day driving. Often these have more additives that are toxic to your catalytic converters and the environment. These oils generally do not have detergents. These are very important for your engine unless you plan on taking it apart every few weeks and cleaning every single surface. The oils do not meet the API / SAE requirements for ratings as SJ, SL or now SM.”

Of course, Motul claims that the 300V is suitable for catalytic converters (and I believe them!). But yup. I checked – Motul’s 300V 4T is NOT certified JASO MA or API SL that the Bajaj manual calls out for. Heck, I don’t even remember that it came with any JASO or API specifications at all! As far as the engine manufacturer is concerned, the 300V is NOT an approved oil type for the Pulsar’s triple-sparked single-cynlinder! And Motul also doesn’t claim that the 300V meets any of these specifications! And rightfully so – because it doesn’t!

Here’s an extract of an exchange from a Ducati forumer with a Motul USA rep:

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The Motul 7100 4T oil is being marketed as “a grade lower” than the racing 300V. But I suppose it’s probably more suitable for my purpose. Similar to the 300V, the 7100 is also ester-based. Which means greater film strength and natural adherence of the oil to the metal surfaces, resulting in greater protection as compared to the more common PAO-based synthetic lubricants.

So, for now, I’ll be sticking to the JASO MA (in fact, it’s JASO MA2) compliant 7100 4T ester-based fully synthetic oil.

Plus, it’s cheaper than the 300V too!

23 thoughts on “Motul 7100 instead of 300V for my Pulsar 200NS”

  1. Nice post. Quick check, does that mean any engine oil that JASO MA2 approved is suitable for 200NS? Also, does it mean it is fully synthetic for JASO MA2 approved? does it matter if it is not fully synthetic?

    1. No. The manual calls for 20W50 API ‘SL’ or JASO MA. There are mineral based JASO MA compliant oils too. Also, API ‘SL’ and JASO MA oils come in different weights too. In summary, you need the correct weight AND correct specification lubrication.

    2. Oh – and JASO MA2 is merely the newer and stricter specification to JASO MA standard that includes compatibility with catalytic converters.

      1. What will you recommend? Fully Synthetic or Synthetic? I am looking to use Liqui Moly’s Street Race, after reading your article, not sure to go with Race type or Street type. Also it’s hard to find Fully Snythetic Street for Liqui Moly, haha

        1. There’s mineral, synthetic, and a blend of both – typically called semi-synthetic. I don’t think I quite understand your “synthetic or fully synthetic” – they’re quite the same thing.

          Of course, some companies resort to funny marketing to confuse buyers. Just find out what the base oil is for the lubricant and decide from there.

          Personally, I would always go with synthetic where possible and available. Synthetic lubricants resist breakdowns far better than their mineral counterparts. So when the oil gets “old”, the synthetics tend to hold up better and continue to protect the engine. Mineral-based lubricants break down and therefore loses its protective abilities.

    1. Unfortunately, only 10W40 and 15W50 were available at the place I bought the oil. So 15W50, being closer to 20W50, was what I chose.

        1. What does your motorcycle’s manual say? You should be safe following your manufacturer’s guidelines. Although almost ALL workshops mechanics I know recommend a very much shorter OCI. Obviously, the more frequently one changes oil, the more the mechanic will make.

  2. Motul 300V 4T exceeds all OEM specifications, including JASO MA2. But that’s not the issue. The real reason why daily-use bikes should not use 300V is because of its incredibly high molybdenum (moly) content, which is intended to mitigate high temps for constant high-revving race bikes. Use of 300V leaves street riders on the wrong end of an intended trade-off.

    1. I’m not too convinced there… I could be wrong, but I don’t remember seeing 300V 4T having any API or JASO approval printed on the label. Motul’s 7100, 5100 and even the 3100 all have JASO MA approval labeled on them. Motul is a large company. These companies know enough to NOT claim it as JASO MA/MA2 or API compliant if they are clearly not – lawsuits ain’t cheap. Motul only goes so far as to claim “OEM Approvals: Above Existing standards” on the 300V, leaving it vague enough to not attract a lawsuit.

      While moly is frequently referred to as a “friction modifier”, it’s primary use is as an anti-wear agent. I trust Motul to have tested the the moly dosage in the 300V to be sufficiently low to not affect wet clutch performance (slippage). If what you claimed is true – that the true reason was due to the moly content, then why would the 300V – with it’s additional ANTI-WEAR component, have LOWER oil change interval (as recommended by a Motul representative) as compared to its 7100 sibling without this ANTI-WEAR agent? I suspect that there’s more to this than just mere moly.

      Now, I’m not saying that the 300V isn’t a great oil – IT IS! I’ve used it, and I kinda liked its feel in my engine. But like drugs and cigarettes – while it gives you that initial high, long term (wrong) use *might* just do more harm than good.

  3. I will be changing to Motul 7100 on my next servicing. My bike currently is a new bike at 17,000km . Is it advisable to be using engine oil grade of 10W40 or higher grade? as i read online is that it is advisable for 20W50 in singapore.

  4. I currently use NS200..using 4T..5100 15W50..MA2.. Technosynthese…. do it is suitable for my ns200? Only use for daily (go to work) and touring on weekend….

  5. The manual for my R1200Rt specifies 20W50 but I live in Canada and often start the bike in temperatures below 5C. I’ve considered using the 15W50 to help with the cold starts. Any reason this would be detrimental?

    1. Hey Chucker. I don’t profess to be an expert in this area, but my understanding is that thinner oils may be easier to start the engine with, but offer slightly less protection. In any case, the difference between 20w50 and 15w50 is likely to be minimal and insignificant.

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