The sgBikerBoy 2016 Trip – Day 5

After 4 days of rather intense riding, I’ve decided to take things a little slow and confirmed my stay in Mae Sot for another night. With accommodation secured, I left most of the luggage in the hotel room, and travelled light, exploring Mae Sot and its surroundings.

First stop was Tararak Waterfall – an approximately 35min ride from where I stayed. Riding without the luggage was interestingly refreshing. The Pulsar 200NS felt like an agile and nimble bike all over again.

To Tararak. I just love the sound of that name. Tararak. Tararak...
To Tararak. I just love the sound of that name. Tararak. Tararak…

I can't read Thai, and so I assumed the sign says this way to the waterfall.
I can’t read Thai, and so I assumed the sign says this way to the waterfall.
Okay! All ready to trek!
Okay! All ready to trek!
Then I saw this...
Then I saw this…
...and this.... *pant pant*
…and this…. *pant pant*
...and finally this. Yes, the last part of the climb was an almost vertical climb. It was more like a ladder than a flight of stairs.
…and finally this. Yes, the last part of the climb was an almost vertical climb. It was more like a ladder than a flight of stairs.
And all the climb to get to this.
And all the climb to get to this.

Hey! Wait a minute here! If they have built this shrine here, I’m sure there’s a road that comes up here. And so I looked around, and yup indeed, there was a road leading up here. Should have rode up here instead.

I've seen a few of these little houses built underneath trees. I think they're for worship of some sort.
I’ve seen a few of these little houses built underneath trees. I think they’re for worship of some sort.
Golden statue of Buddha.
Golden statue of Buddha.
View from the top.
View from the top.
I couldn't find the way to the waterfall, so I had to settle for the downstream mini-fall.
I couldn’t find the way to the waterfall, so I had to settle for the downstream mini-fall.

I didn’t stay too long here, as honestly, the fall was a little underwhelming. So I headed to the next fall, the Pacharoen Waterfall. That’s another 20min ride away.

This way to Pacharoen Waterfall.
This way to Pacharoen Waterfall.

The Pacharoen Waterfall resides within the Pacharoen National Park. Just a little walk into the national park, I was greeted with a cacophony of singing cicadas. I’ve always been able to recognise their distinct song, but never managed to spot one up close… until now.

Yup! It was a huge one – about the length of my middle finger. I was careful not to approach it too closely and scare it away.

Ah! This one's much better than the previous!
Ah! This one’s much better than the previous!
Awesome view of the Pacharoen Waterfall
Awesome view of the Pacharoen Waterfall
Chilling with a cold drink. Seems like a punch of orange, pineapple and cucumber.
Chilling with a cold drink. Seems like a punch of orange, pineapple and cucumber.

I hung around Pacharoen for awhile before heading to Maekasa…

Enroute to Maekasa
Enroute to Maekasa
500m ahead to Maekasa hot spring! I could already smell the sulphur in the air.
500m ahead to Maekasa hot spring! I could already smell the sulphur in the air.
Maekasa Hot Spring!
Maekasa Hot Spring!
The steamy hot spring fountain.
The steamy hot spring fountain.

 

Feet soaking at the constructed hot spring pond.
Feet soaking at the constructed hot spring pond.
38 to 42 degC water. Not enough to cook eggs.
38 to 42 degC water. Not enough to cook eggs.
Aahhh! That feels so good... until it stated raining!
Aahhh! That feels so good… until it stated raining!
So I took shelter at the nearby eatery and had my lunch there.
So I took shelter at the nearby eatery and had my lunch there.
Past some fields on the way back to Mae Sot
Past some fields on the way back to Mae Sot
Travelling through some dirt road.
Travelling through some dirt road.
And since I was in Mae Sot, I rode up to the Thai-Myanmar border. That's the Thai immigration block.
And since I was in Mae Sot, I rode up to the Thai-Myanmar border. That’s the Thai immigration block.
That's Myanmar just across the bridge. I didn't have the necessary Myanmar travel visa, so this is as far as I could go.
That’s Myanmar just across the bridge. I didn’t have the necessary Myanmar travel visa, so this is as far as I could go.
Myanmar just across the river. The concertina wire barrier reminded me of my military days.
Myanmar just across the river. The concertina wire barrier reminded me of my military days.
The weather was hot, so I ordered an ice-cold coconut. Refreshing!
The weather was hot, so I ordered an ice-cold coconut. Refreshing!
What I love about it here is that I can ride up to the stall and place my order.
What I love about it here is that I can ride up to the stall and place my order.
The skies opened and poured from late afternoon till evening. I was warm and dry in my hotel room, but was hungry. Since I didn't want to ride in the rain, I ordered some food from the hotel. THB120 for the green curry and the "King salad".
The skies opened and poured from late afternoon till evening. I was warm and dry in my hotel room, but was hungry. Since I didn’t want to ride in the rain, I ordered some food from the hotel. THB120 for the green curry and the “King salad”.
I've always wanted to do this.... Not breakfast, but dinner in bed. =)
I’ve always wanted to do this…. Not breakfast, but dinner in bed. =)

4 thoughts on “The sgBikerBoy 2016 Trip – Day 5”

  1. Hello, and greetings from a Danish bike (bicycle and from this year, motor as well) rider based in Tokyo. I just want to say I enjoy reading your trip report, day by day, and the quirky little things that happen along the way – exactly what travelers grow to expect and enjoy (but never quite getting rid of the trepidation, like when the “low-fuel” indicator comes on.” In Feb. my wife and I took our triathlon bicycles with us fm Japan for a week in Chiang Mai, and another week Deep South in Krabi. More snorkeling and hiking than cycling, but we found roadside food and roadside “natural attractions” just as you describe them, including waterfalls that are pretty underwhelming and food that gets a bit … repetitive. But hey, the road leads us on and the vistas keep changing. (BTW, the reason I found your blog is that you come up on Google search for owning and reporting on the Kabuto helmet. I am thinking of getting one too.) Best wishes and safe travels, Peter in Tokyo

    1. Greetings Peter! It’s always nice to hear from fellow travelers! Yeah – that “low-fuel” incident was unnerving, but nothing compared to (spoiler alert!) that breakdown I experienced in Pai. Thinking back, I’m amazed at myself for being able to source spares, ship them up from Singapore, arranged for a 3-hour tow, and got a workshop who was adventurous enough to work on my (unknown) bike! LOL!

      Oh! The Kabuto Ibuki? I’m still using it as my primary helmet and would recommend it wholeheartedly. =)

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