The 60cents DIY BMW G650GS Oil Fill Cap Removal Tool

The BMW G650GS has a dry oil sump design and has its oil reservoir situated where the fuel tank typically resides. And in typical BMW fashion, it requires a speciality tool to remove the oil cap. Yes, the bike’s accompanying tool kit does contain a multi-use wrench that would also open the oil fill cap. But accessing the tool pouch was an inconvenient 4-step process – top box removal, panel removal (using key), seat removal, then tool pouch removal (which is a pain due to the really tight space the tool pouch is situated).

Speciality tool sold on eBay.

So, for garage maintenance, and to encourage periodic checking of engine oil levels, I’d prefer to have a tool readily available.

The ones on eBay cost easily over $20. Just for a dumb piece of plastic – $20?!! So in true DIY fashion, after some measuring, I realised that any 22-23mm hexagonal tool should do the job. I dumped the idea of 3D-printing it – as it’ll likely cost as much as the $20 eBay tool for such a low-volume production.

The $0.60 tool! GM PN:15646250.

After some online scouring, I realised that the GM wheel nut cover (PN:15646250) would fit the bill – and (very, very) inexpensively too!

Arrived quite quickly. Didn’t care for the simple packaging. For less than $0.60 shipped, I’m not complaining.
The GM wheel nut cover with a 22mm hex head.
The BMW G650GS Sertao oil fill cap.
It fits!

The cheap tool fits and works perfectly well! It was only then that I realised that I’ve probably over-tightened the oil fill cap. It was almost impossible for me to remove the cap just by twisting the circular tool.

So, a simple modification to the tool – by drilling 2 holes through it to allow a screwdriver to be put through for leverage solves the problem.

A little modification to the tool to gain some leverage using a screwdriver.

Ta-da! My very own DIY $0.60 BMW G650GS oil cap removal tool!

12 thoughts on “The 60cents DIY BMW G650GS Oil Fill Cap Removal Tool”

  1. Excellent article! Thank you for sharing. I used to own a G650GS and the battery keeps dying on me because I don’t use it often enough and the IU was connected directly. Getting to the battery was a pain… like you described. Top box, rack, seat and then 10 screws just to get the cover off to access the battery. I would expect better design from BMW.

    1. That was why I re-wired the IU to turn on only when the bike was on. I’ve tried not starting the bike in 2 months with this setup, and it still started fine.

      1. Oh I also forgot… that to take the tank center cover off (after removing 10 screws) to access the battery, I still have to remove the engine oil cap… really crazy design. I cannot imagine if I have had to do this in the middle of a deserted road somewhere!

        1. I’m aware. And it comes with thee bike too. And that’s what I’ve been using for my oil changes on the Sertao. Thing is, I carry it on the bike all the time as part of the BMW toolkit. It’s buried so deeply down that it’s a pain to get to it when all I want to do is a quick oil level check. I am way more than willing to pay this 60 cents just so that I don’t have to dig for the spark plug socket from the tool pouch.

          Oh. And I don’t have an old spark plug socket laying around too. =(

  2. Excellent. Though I do not own any bike now, I found the articles well written and apt:) Please post more:)

  3. Hard to see, but this must be the *real* BMW 650GS – ie a derated 750cc engine.
    The first new BMW I bought was the R650GS Rotax abomination with, wait for it, a 650cc engine (8-)# My first BMW was a 1950 500 twin I bought in 1965 for £15.

    It would take too long to list all the Rotax faults – rear sprocket bearings (many of them), fluid leaks, cables to instrument panel, leaky top box etc etc. There were so many (all under warranty) that I forget them all. The final killer was an all new wiring loom. I traded it in for the *real* R650GS, but never had to remove the oil cap!

    Since then I have only had minor issues. R800GS which wouldn’t switch off. R1250GS Adventure which ate CR2032 batteries in hours. I first found out on my return from a month in the USA. The bike was only a week old when I left. I had to get on the road using the under wheel arch key – hard to reach the ignition when one’s hand is under the rear mudguard! I used dozens of batteries, and service even charged me for a replacement battery, which died in an hour.

      1. I sincerely hope yours is better than mine was. One fault – a leaking clutch seal, happened *five* times. At one stage they had to drill out two case screws to remove the cover.

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